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Solar System Miniature miniature orrery solar system model dollhouse scale wood Miniature System Solar

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It is important to know at any age!

However, the fact of the matter is that moon will always remain the best option for mankind. The reason for this stems from the fact that the moon can always act as a stepping stone to the rest of the solar system and beyond. This is only natural, as the moon is in a very close proximity to Earth. Only by taking a 3 day trip, it is possible to reach the Moon with standard chemical propulsion techniques. However, in retrospect, going to Mars would require almost 100 times the amount of trip time of moon, since Mars is about 1000 times further then the moon. The amount of life support that is required for a mission that will take 2 years or more is definitely very costly and more importantly, the technological capability is not there. Thus, with our present global financial and technical capability, the moon is the only realistic option.



and here is another

When a moon is in an orbit around its parent-planet, all is well--just as long as the gravity that is holding the moon together in one piece exceeds the powerful, relentless pull of its planet. Alas, if a moon wanders too close, and the tidal forces of the parent-planet exceed the gravitational bind of the unlucky moon, the moon will fall apart. This is termed the Roche limit. Earth's relatively large Moon is a very fortunate natural satellite, and the limit here is a bit under 10,000 kilometers--while our Moon is a safe 385,000 kilometers away from our planet.



and finally

Earth's Moon is a brilliant, beguiling, bewitching companion world. The largest and brightest object in our planet's night sky, it has for eons been the source of wild magical tales, myths, and poetry--as well as an ancient symbol for romantic love. Some traditional tales tell of a man's face etched on its bright surface, while still others whisper haunting childhood stories of a "Moon Rabbit". Lovely, ancient, and fantastic stories aside, Earth's Moon is a real object, a large rocky sphere that has been with our planet almost from the very beginning, when our Solar System was first forming over four billion years ago. But where did Earth's Moon come from? In April 2014, a team of planetary scientists announced that they had pinned down the birth date of the Moon to within 100 million years of the formation of our Solar System, and this new discovery indicates that Earth's Moon was most likely born about 4.47 billion years ago in a gigantic collision between a Mars-sized object and the primordial Earth.

Other facts:

The scientists then went on to determine that the lunar birthday must have occurred approximately 95 million years after the formation of our Solar System--give or take about 32 million years.



The more widely accepted theory that the planets and regular moons formed together from the same swirling cloud of gas and dust, works well as an explanation for the larger moons of our Solar System, such as the four Galilean moons--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto--orbiting the giant planet Jupiter. However, the multitude of smaller moons, swarming around the giant planets, "have so far been considered a by-product," Dr. Crida commented in the November 29, 2012 Scientific American.



The researchers continued to explain that their scenario makes strong predictions for how the tortured, misty large moon Titan formed, what the icy mid-sized moons are made of, and how they began as rapidly spinning lumps of ice-laden material. The little moons could provide valuable clues that reveal to planetary scientists what happened in this mysterious outer region of our Solar System--as well as when it happened.