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A little interesting about space life.

Jupiter, the largest planet in our Solar System, also has the largest moon--Ganymede. A large number of Jovian moons sport highly elliptical orbits and also circle backwards--that is, opposite to the spin of their planet. Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune also sport such so-called irregular moons, that orbit far from their respective parent planets.



and here is another

Europa, an icy little moon that circles the giant planet Jupiter, probably sustains a global ocean of liquid water beneath a tortured, shattered icy crust. For a long time, weird and jumbled regions of ice disruption, called "chaos terrains", were seen only on Europa, and their origins remained cloaked in mystery. But astronomers now think that the "chaos terrains" formed as the result of a subsurface liquid saltwater lake, equal to all of the Great Lakes on Earth combined. Hidden about 1.9 miles beneath Europa's cracked eggshell-like frozen crust, the ice-embedded lake may be one of the latest potentially habitable environments discovered so far in our Solar System.



and finally

Moons are natural satellites that orbit another body that, in turn, circles its parent-star. A moon is held in place by both its own gravity and the gravitational grip of its host planet. Some planets have moons; some do not. Several asteroids in our Solar System also are orbited by very small moons--and some dwarf planets, such as Pluto, also have moons. One of Pluto's five moons, Charon, is almost 50% the size of Pluto. For this reason, the two frozen worlds inhabiting our Solar System's remote twilight zone, are sometimes classified as a double-planet.

Other facts:

Planetary scientists believed for years that Earth's Moon is depleted of water and other volatile compounds. However, this idea began to change in 2008, when a team of scientists announced that they had detected traces of water in some of the volcanic glass beads carried back to Earth from the Apollo 15 and 17 missions to the Moon. In 2011, additional study of extremely small crystalline formations within those beads revealed that they contain amounts of water that are similar to some basalts on Earth. This indicates that the lunar mantle--at least, part of it--contains as much water as Earth's.



"A major difficulty has been to explain why a giant impact on Mars would have left two moons so different from our own Moon, a huge single mass, that also formed from Earth undergoing such an impact," explained Dr. Sebastien Charnoz in a July 4, 2016 Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) Press Release. Dr. Charnoz is a planetary scientist at the Institut de Physique Du Globe De Paris (IPG) who contributed to the new research.



To help solve this mystery, Dr. Jacobson and his team devised supercomputer simulations of the growth of our Solar System's inner quartet of rocky, terrestrial planets out of the protoplanetary accretion disk swirling around our young Sun, from which the planetary building blocks, the planetesimals, eventually formed.