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A little interesting about space life.

Neptune is circled by only 14 moons, a considerably smaller number than Jupiter's 70. Also, most of Neptune's moons are extremely small. Triton, however, is an exception. In fact, Triton harbors 99.7% of the mass of Neptune's entire system of moons combined. The second-largest irregular moon in our Solar System, Phoebe of Saturn, sports only about 0.03% of Triton's mass. It is thought that Triton was snared by its adopted parent-planet some time after Neptune had already formed a system of moons. This means that the capture of the wandering Triton was likely a catastrophic event for Neptune's original moons, disrupting their orbits, and causing them to blast into each other--thus creating a rubble disc.



and here is another

In this fascinating new research, the astronomers announced that they have discovered that a duo of Pluto's moons, dubbed Nix and Hydra, are actually in a chaotic rotation. This basically means that an observer standing on the alien surface of icy, strange Pluto, would not observe the same face of its moons from one night to the next. For those observers visiting the two bizarre moons themselves, things would be even weirder because every day would be a different length from the one that came before it.



and finally

Pluto itself is a relatively large denizen of the distant Kuiper Belt, that orbits our Sun in the frigid company of a vast multitude of other bewitching and mysterious icy objects. Like other Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), Pluto is thought to be composed primarily of ice and rock. It is an intriguing frozen "oddball", a mere 1/6 the mass of Earth's own Moon and 1/3 its volume. Pluto also has a highly inclined, eccentric orbit that carries it from 30 to 49 Astronomical Units (AU) from our Sun. One AU is equal to the mean Earth-Sun separation of 93,000,000 miles. As a result, Pluto periodically moves towards our Sun at a distance that is closer to our Star than Neptune. Very fortunately for both Neptune and Pluto, an orbital resonance with Neptune prevents the duo from crashing into each other.

Other facts:

On July 20, 1969, during one of the defining moments of the human history, Neil Armstrong became the first man to step on the surface of Earth's Moon. In his own words, it was truly "one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind."



Of the four terrestrial, rocky planets of the inner Solar System (Mercury, Venus, our Earth, and Mars), both Mercury and Venus are moonless. Earth possesses one lone Moon, but it is a very large one--the fifth largest moon in our entire Solar System, in fact. Mars, on the other hand, has two tiny misshapen moons that resemble rocky potatoes, and are lumpy and dark, as they travel in their nearly circular orbits close to the plane of the Martian equator. The Martian moons, Phobos and Deimos, are probably asteroids that were captured by Mars long ago.



Astronomers have for years contemplated two competing hypotheses explaining the origin of the Martian moons. The first proposes that Phobos and Deimos are, indeed, escapees from the Main Asteroid Belt. Alas, this viewpoint begs the question of why they should have been so cruelly captured by their adopted parent-planet in the first place. An alternative theory points to the possibility that the moons were born from the debris left by a violent collision between Mars and a primordial protoplanet--a baby planet still under construction. However, this theory also suffers from uncertainty because it does not explain precisely how this particular tragic mechanism gave rise to Phobos and Deimos.