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A little interesting about space life.

The other duo of Pluto's five known moons being studied, Kerberos and Styx, are also currently thought to be in chaotic rotation as well! However, Pluto well may have a few more small moons that have not as yet been spotted--at least, as of this writing.



and here is another

However, if we look closely on the original moon landing footage, we can see that the flag is actually standing still, and not moving in any way during the entire tape. But why is the flag still?



and finally

Saturn, along with its frozen retinue of icy rings, dazzling moons, and sparkling moonlets, orbits our Sun about ten times farther out than the Earth. Astronomers received their first collection of detailed data about Titan when the Cassini/Huygens orbiter and lander arrived there in 2004. The Huygens lander successfully obtained revealing images when it drifted down to Titan's tormented, hydrocarbon-slashed surface, as well as when it was still floating slowly and softly down through the moon's thick, foggy, orange atmosphere--which has 1.4 times greater pressure than that of our own planet. These pictures, when combined with other studies using instruments aboard the Cassini orbiter, reveal to curious planetary scientists that Titan's geological features include lakes and river channels filled with methane, ethane, and propane. Titan's strange surface also shows mountains and sand dunes--and it is pockmarked by craters. The rippling dunes form when fierce winds sweep up loose particles from the surface and then tosses them downwind. However, the sands of Titan are not like the sands on our Earth. Titan's "sand" is both bizarre and alien, probably composed of very small particles of solid hydrocarbons--or, possibly, ice imprisoned within hydrocarbons--with a density of about one-third that of the sand on our own planet. Furthermore, Titan's gravity is low. In fact, it is only approximately one-seventh that of Earth. This means that, working in combination with the low density of Titan's sand particles, they carry only the small weight of a mere four percent that of terrestrial sand. Titan's "sand" is about the same light-weight as freeze-dried grains of coffee!

Other facts:

Born approximately 4.51 billion years ago, Earth's companion world formed soon after our own planet's birth in the primordial Solar System. The average separation between Earth and Moon is about 238,000 miles (1.28 light-seconds), and it is locked in synchronous rotation with Earth--meaning that it always shows us the same face. The near-side of our Moon is known for its bewitching dark volcanic maria (Latin for seas) that are located between large impact craters, as well as for its very ancient, bright crustal highlands. The lunar surface is really extremely dark--even though it appears to be very bright in the night sky above our planet--with a reflectance only a bit higher than that of old asphalt. The prominent position of our lunar companion in the dark midnight sky, as well as its rhythmic and regular cycle of phases, made our Moon an important influence on human culture ever since ancient times--especially in mythology, art, language, and on calendars.



The crust of Earth's Moon is 43 miles thick on the near-side hemisphere, and 93 miles on the far-side. It is composed of silicon, magnesium, oxygen, calcium, aluminum, and iron. There are also trace amounts of titanium, uranium, thorium, hydrogen, and potassium.



In the fourth century BCE, Aristotle recorded that Mars vanished behind Earth's Moon during an occultation. This suggested that the planet was farther away than our Moon. The Greek astronomer, Ptolemy, who lived in Alexandria, attempted to solve the problem of the orbital motion of the Red Planet. Ptolemy's collective works and model on astronomy was presented in his multi-volume collection, titled the Almagest. The Almagest became the authoritative work on Western astronomy for the next 400 years. Ancient Chinese astronomers were also aware of the existence of Mars by no later than the fourth century BCE. In the fifth century CE, the Indian astronomical work titled Surya Siddhanta proposed a measurement of the estimated diameter of Mars. In East Asian cultures, Mars is usually referred to as the "fire star"--based on the Five Elements: fire, wood, metal, water, and earth.