NASA Charts Shut Down second space telescope shuts down nasa says wallstreet news Shut Down NASA Charts

NASA Charts Shut Down second space telescope shuts down nasa says wallstreet news Shut Down NASA Charts

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A little interesting about space life.

The Kuiper Belt is populated by mostly small, frigid objects, which are relics of our Solar System's formation 4.56 billion years ago. Most KBOs are primarily composed of frozen volatiles, such as water, methane, and ammonia. The Kuiper Belt is also the home of two other officially designated dwarf planets (in addition to Pluto): Haumea and Makemake. A few of our Solar System's moons, such as Saturn's Phoebe and Neptune's Triton, are also commonly thought to have been born in this distant and mysterious region.



and here is another

No Satellite Pictures. Even with all of our telescopes on Earth and the incredibly powerful Hubble Telescope, none of them has ever taken any pictures with any of the landing sites of the Moon. This often misleads us to the thought: are they really out there?



and finally

Since the beginning of civilization, mankind has always been looking toward the stars. Perhaps this is because mankind is always looking for ways to expand his sphere of influence. In order to achieve this, it is essential that mankind to expand further out into space. Especially when mankind stepped onto the Lunar soil for the first time; the possibility of expanding further towards the stars became a true reality. Of course, that feat has not been repeated after the original 6 lunar flights. Nowadays, there is a lot of talk in various space agencies about the possibility of sending a new mission to the moon again.

Other facts:

Legend has it that A) the day he was born as Prince Siddhartha Gautama in ca. 563 B.C., B) the day of his 'Great Enlightenment' under the Bodhi tree (Tree of Enlightenment) in ca. 533 B.C. and C) the day of his death, i.e. his passing on to 'Nibbana' or 'Parinibanna' (a state of neither being existent nor non-existent that to reach is Buddhism's ultimate goal) as 'Buddha', meaning the 'Enlightened One' in ca. 483 B.C. fell all on a full-moon day, the day celebrated by the Burmese Buddhists as full-moon day of Kason. For this reason this day is also called 'Thrice Blessed Day' or 'Three-fold Anniversary'. Subsequently the 'Full-moon Day of Kason' marks the three main events of Siddhartha Gautama Buddha's life and as such it is celebrated in a fitting manner by Burmese Buddhists all over the country.



Some of the images focus on the shallow center of a bizarre impact crater dubbed Pwyll. Impact rays and shattered pieces of material scattered over an immense area of the moon tell the tale of a sizeable meteorite that collided violently with Europa relatively recently--"only" about 10 to 100 million years ago. There is also darker debris chaotically scattered around Pwyll. This further suggests that the large crashing meteorite may have dug up some deeply buried material, and tossed it helter-skelter around the crater.



"What people frequently forget in this field is that you never have just one big impact. We have to worry about how big the next biggest impact was," and whether that impact blurred the effects of the previous giant impact, he continued to explain.