Mars Curiosity Sunrise 9 years on barsoom the road to endeavour Sunrise Mars Curiosity

Mars Curiosity Sunrise 9 years on barsoom the road to endeavour Sunrise Mars Curiosity

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Curious facts about cosmic life and their inhabitants.

The evolutionary process has produced many light producing creatures in the caves. These creatures are commonly found on lakes, on land and in the mountainous areas of the caves. Bioluminescent organisms in the moon are not at all similar to those on earth. They are much more efficient light producers. People living in the moon have found ways to promote the growth of bioluminescent organisms on a mass scale. Though not very significant in terms of contribution, these organisms are part of the light sources. The moon people have been using fire for thousands of years for cooking and lighting. Man-made lamps and torches are used for illuminating the dwellings and public areas as an additional light source.



and here is another

Of course, in view of the recent findings, there are other reasons why Moon is so important for mankind. First of all, the findings from the Chandrayaan probe have shown unequivocally that water exists in the lunar poles. Hence, with the existence of water, colonizing the moon has not only become possible, it has become imperative. As you know, water contains both hydrogen as well as oxygen atoms. Hydrogen can be used as a propellant and as an energy source, while water can be used as an oxidizer as well as a major life support requirement. The oxygen is especially important, as it can be filtered to provide air and the water itself can be used from variety of ways from drinking to being used as a coolant in various subsystems. In addition, the proximity of the moon promises the transference of raw materials such as Helium 3 as well as iron that can be found beneath the lunar regolith. Hence, it is the time to go back to the Moon again for the sake of mankind.



and finally

Triton also possesses a thin atmosphere composed mainly of nitrogen, and a smaller quantity of methane. This atmosphere probably is the result of Triton's cryovolcanism, which is enhanced by seasonal heating from the Sun. Although little is currently known of Pluto's atmosphere, it is thought to be primarily composed of nitrogen with some carbon monoxide and methane added to the mix--and it is extremely tenuous. Pluto's very thin atmosphere may exist as a gas only when Pluto is nearest to the Sun (perihelion). For most of Pluto's very long year, the atmospheric gases are frozen in the form of ice on its extremely frigid surface. One year on Triton is almost 248 Earth-years long--or 90,471 Earth-days!

Other facts:

"We've found a likely solution to the long-standing problem of how Triton arrived in its peculiar orbit. In addition, this mechanism introduces a new pathway for the capture of satellites by planets that may be relevant to other objects in the Solar System," explained Dr. Craig Agnor, a researcher from the University of California, Santa Cruz, in the May 10, 2006 issue of Time Magazine.



"More generally, our findings clarify how giant impacts give birth to satellites and can create a diverse variety of satellite systems," Dr. Charnoz told the press on July 4, 2016. He added that the team could apply their method to other regions of our Universe:



The more widely accepted theory that the planets and regular moons formed together from the same swirling cloud of gas and dust, works well as an explanation for the larger moons of our Solar System, such as the four Galilean moons--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto--orbiting the giant planet Jupiter. However, the multitude of smaller moons, swarming around the giant planets, "have so far been considered a by-product," Dr. Crida commented in the November 29, 2012 Scientific American.