Jupiter 4 Moons Names the jovian moons all about astronomy 4 Jupiter Moons Names

Jupiter 4 Moons Names the jovian moons all about astronomy 4 Jupiter Moons Names

We found 22++ Images in Jupiter 4 Moons Names:




About this page - Jupiter 4 Moons Names

Jupiter 4 Moons Names Moons Of Jupiter One Minute Astronomer Moons Names 4 Jupiter, Jupiter 4 Moons Names The Jovian Moons All About Astronomy 4 Jupiter Moons Names, Jupiter 4 Moons Names Jupiter 4 Jupiter Names Moons, Jupiter 4 Moons Names Nasa Announces It Hasn39t Found Aliens On One Of Jupiter39s Jupiter Moons 4 Names, Jupiter 4 Moons Names Jupiter New World Encyclopedia 4 Names Moons Jupiter, Jupiter 4 Moons Names Lost In Space Solar System Tour Jupiter The Other Shoe Jupiter 4 Names Moons.

Curious facts about cosmic life and their inhabitants.

Dr. Lieber and his colleagues did a study to test the theory of full-moon "lunacy". They studied data on murders in Dade County of Florida which covered 15 years and a total of 1,887 deaths by homicide. When they compared the deaths with the phases of the moon, they found that the two rose and fell together for the entire 15 years! With the approach of a full or new moon, there was a sharp spike in the murder rate, and then a decline during the first and last quarters of the moon.



and here is another

Of the four terrestrial, rocky planets of the inner Solar System (Mercury, Venus, our Earth, and Mars), both Mercury and Venus are moonless. Earth possesses one lone Moon, but it is a very large one--the fifth largest moon in our entire Solar System, in fact. Mars, on the other hand, has two tiny misshapen moons that resemble rocky potatoes, and are lumpy and dark, as they travel in their nearly circular orbits close to the plane of the Martian equator. The Martian moons, Phobos and Deimos, are probably asteroids that were captured by Mars long ago.



and finally

Saturn, along with its frozen retinue of icy rings, dazzling moons, and sparkling moonlets, orbits our Sun about ten times farther out than the Earth. Astronomers received their first collection of detailed data about Titan when the Cassini/Huygens orbiter and lander arrived there in 2004. The Huygens lander successfully obtained revealing images when it drifted down to Titan's tormented, hydrocarbon-slashed surface, as well as when it was still floating slowly and softly down through the moon's thick, foggy, orange atmosphere--which has 1.4 times greater pressure than that of our own planet. These pictures, when combined with other studies using instruments aboard the Cassini orbiter, reveal to curious planetary scientists that Titan's geological features include lakes and river channels filled with methane, ethane, and propane. Titan's strange surface also shows mountains and sand dunes--and it is pockmarked by craters. The rippling dunes form when fierce winds sweep up loose particles from the surface and then tosses them downwind. However, the sands of Titan are not like the sands on our Earth. Titan's "sand" is both bizarre and alien, probably composed of very small particles of solid hydrocarbons--or, possibly, ice imprisoned within hydrocarbons--with a density of about one-third that of the sand on our own planet. Furthermore, Titan's gravity is low. In fact, it is only approximately one-seventh that of Earth. This means that, working in combination with the low density of Titan's sand particles, they carry only the small weight of a mere four percent that of terrestrial sand. Titan's "sand" is about the same light-weight as freeze-dried grains of coffee!

Other facts:

There are several potential explanations that could account for the sea's composition of pure methane, Dr. Le Gall added. "Either Ligeia Mare is replenished by fresh methane rainfall, or something is removing ethane from it. It is possible that the ethane ends up in the undersea crust, or that it somehow flows into the adjacent sea, Kraken Mare, but that will require further investigation," she noted.



Earth's Moon is the fifth largest moon in our entire Solar System, as well as the only world beyond our planet that we have visited. Our lunar companion is the largest and brightest object in the sky at night, and many astronomers think that it was born when the tragedy that was the pulverized Theia blasted into ancient Earth billions of years ago. There are other theories, however, that seek to explain how our Moon came to be. Nevertheless, the Giant Impact theory stands its ground as the most credible explanation for lunar birth. When the doomed, destroyed Theia impacted Earth, it shot debris above our planet. This abundant debris eventually coalesced to form our Moon.



So whether you're sailing down Moon River or giving a good howl, take a good look at the Moon, our guidepost to the monthly cycle of our lives.