In Our Solar System Planets Largest to Smallest the largest moons and smallest planets Planets System In Our Smallest Solar Largest to

In Our Solar System Planets Largest to Smallest the largest moons and smallest planets Planets System In Our Smallest Solar Largest to

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A little interesting about space life.

All the cities conduct ceremonial functions to welcome incoming visitors and to bid farewell to the outgoing visitors. As everybody either leaves a city or reaches a new city on a particular fixed day, these ceremonies are held at predetermined venues. As the logistics stand, this ceremonial function repeats on every fourteenth day in every city center. The day long ceremonies create good meeting opportunities for the people.



and here is another

Judith E. Braffman-Miller is a writer and astronomer whose articles have been published since 1981 in various newspapers, journals, and magazines. Although she has written on a variety of topics, she particularly loves writing about astronomy because it gives her the opportunity to communicate to others the many wonders of her field. Her first book, "Wisps, Ashes, and Smoke," will be published soon.



and finally

Unfortunately, even though mankind has gone to the moon in 1969, this is still not a simple feat in the 21st century. Most of the know how accumulated during the lunar flights have been lost due to the fact that production facilities have been dismantled and many experts who worked on the lunar missions either have retired or died. Right now, it would be impossible to replicate the Saturn 5 rockets that were used to launch the original Moon Mission. Thus, due to this, it has become impossible to fly to the moon again without some sort of a preparation. Hence, many scientists state that going to Mars is a better option as compared to going to the Moon.

Other facts:

Neptune, the eighth major planet from the Sun, and its neighboring sister-planet, Uranus--the seventh planet from the Sun--are both classified as ice-giants because their large cores are icy, and they never managed to acquire the immense gaseous envelopes of the two true gas-giants, Jupiter and Saturn. The gas giants are possibly composed entirely of gas and liquid, although they may have small solid cores. In contrast, the ice-giants have large solid cores and thinner atmospheres. The two gas-giants, being mostly atmosphere, are very lightweight for their size. Saturn is the lightest planet in our Solar System, despite its immense diameter. In fact, Saturn is light enough to float like a huge raft in water, provided there was an ocean big enough for it to bob around in.



Planetary scientists believed for years that Earth's Moon is depleted of water and other volatile compounds. However, this idea began to change in 2008, when a team of scientists announced that they had detected traces of water in some of the volcanic glass beads carried back to Earth from the Apollo 15 and 17 missions to the Moon. In 2011, additional study of extremely small crystalline formations within those beads revealed that they contain amounts of water that are similar to some basalts on Earth. This indicates that the lunar mantle--at least, part of it--contains as much water as Earth's.



Most of Saturn's natural satellites are very small and icy dancing moonlets. However, the larger, icy midsized moons twirl around their enormous ringed planet in a lovely and mysterious dance. The largest of the icy moons is Rhea, Saturn's second-largest moon after the weird world that is Titan. Iapetus, the third largest of Saturn's moons, is two-faced, with one side composed of gleaming, very bright, highly reflective ice, and the other, dark and non-reflective, a blackened splotch staining the pristine white ice. Iapetus is larger than Mimas and Enceladus. There is an enormous impact crater on the moon Mimas, that stands out as a prominent feature on what is apparently a badly bombarded, heavily cratered world. The large impact crater Herschel on this 400-kilometer moon was excavated by a tumbling chunk of space-stuff made of rock, ice, or both, that came very close to powdering the entire little moon. Another icy moon, Enceladus, is a bewitching world, 500-kilometers in diameter, that is thought to harbor a global subsurface ocean beneath its frozen crust. Where there is liquid water there is always the possibility--though, by no means, the promise--of life. Enceladus also has the highest albedo of any other moon in our Solar System. This means that it has the most dazzlingly bright reflective surface. It also possesses a very active geology, rendering it almost free of craters because it is constantly being resurfaced by the emissions of gushing icy geysers that are responsible for fresh snow that keeps the surface of the little moon sparkling and smooth.