Horsehead Nebula Information the horsehead nebula in orion nebulas horsehead nebula Horsehead Information Nebula

Horsehead Nebula Information the horsehead nebula in orion nebulas horsehead nebula Horsehead Information Nebula

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A little interesting about space life.

Clearly, Triton is a bizarre moon-world, circling its giant parent-planet in the wrong direction. As Triton wandered away from its birthplace in the Kuiper Belt, during its journey through the darkness of interplanetary space, it at last ventured close enough to Neptune to feel the powerful lure of its gravitational embrace. As Neptune drew its adopted moon-child closer and closer, the frigid wanderer from afar experienced a sea-change from a comet-like inhabitant of the Kuiper Belt, to a moon of one of the major planets in our Solar System. So, now, Triton inhabits its new home, orbiting the planet Neptune, but orbiting it backwards. And like all moons, wherever they may be, it is now a dependent of its parent-planet. Indeed, Triton was given its name as an allusion to the demigod Triton's dependence on the sea-god Neptune in Greek mythology.



and here is another

For most of the 20th century, astronomers thought that Pluto was a lonely little world, a solitary ball of ice circling our Sun, so very far from the comforting warmth and delightful light of our brilliant Star. However, in 1992, the discovery of the first KBO (other than Pluto), made astronomers come to the realization that Pluto is not far from the madding crowd of a vast population of other Kuiper Belt ice balls.



and finally

However, the truth is more prosaic. As it is on Earth, landscape of the Moon is not perfectly flat. Because of the uneven surface with bumps and small hills, shadows cast on different vertical angles had also large horizontal angular differences. On the photo above, shadows of the lunar module and the rocks point in slightly different directions. However, the lunar module is standing on flat ground and the rocks are located on a small bump(similar setting has been also recreated by the Mythbusters, proving the conspiracy wrong)

Other facts:

For a long time, planetary scientists thought that in the aftermath of the Moon-forming collision, hydrogen dissociated from water molecules. According to this scenario, both water and other elements that have low boiling temperatures (volatile elements), escaped from the disk and were lost forever to space. This model would form a volatile-element-depleted and bone-dry Moon. At the time, this scenario seemed to be consistent with earlier analyses of lunar samples.



Moons are natural satellites that orbit another body that, in turn, circles its parent-star. A moon is held in place by both its own gravity and the gravitational grip of its host planet. Some planets have moons; some do not. Several asteroids in our Solar System also are orbited by very small moons--and some dwarf planets, such as Pluto, also have moons. One of Pluto's five moons, Charon, is almost 50% the size of Pluto. For this reason, the two frozen worlds inhabiting our Solar System's remote twilight zone, are sometimes classified as a double-planet.



Now we know that there are over 100 moons circling the eight major planets of our Sun's family. The majority of our Solar System's moons are icy, small, and frozen worlds that contain only small quantities of rocky material. The distant multitude of sparkling, icy moons in our Solar System are primarily in orbit around the four giant gaseous planets, Here, in this strange, frigid and dimly-lit realm, far from our Star's melting fires and brilliant light, these tiny frozen moons do their fabulous, lovely dance around their quartet of parent-planets. The giant, gaseous worlds that inhabit our Solar System's outer suburbs--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune--are blanketed by heavy atmospheres of gas, and are accompanied, in their travels around our Star, by their orbiting retinue of many moons and sparkling, icy moonlets.