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Interesting facts about space.

The "lunar effect" is a term used to make a correlation between specific stages of the Earth's lunar cycle and deviant behavior in humans and possibly even animals. This is a pseudoscientific theory, which is one based on science but having no real scientific proof. It is also a theory studied within the realms of sociology, psychology and physiology and has for many centuries been a topic of studies and beliefs. Even the term "lunacy" is derived from the name Luna, a Roman moon goddess.



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The true reason you can't see the stars in photos and videos of Moon is not that the stars aren't there, but rather because of the omnipresent sunlight and the exposure limits of cameras.



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"This is still very much an area of active research, so there is much that scientists including our Department of Terrestrial Magnetism staff scientist Erik Hauri, as well as many other Carnegie colleagues and alumni, are figuring out about how much water exists on the Moon. This is a highly important and challenging question to answer given that we have limited knowledge on the history and distribution of lunar water," explained Dr. Miki Nakajima in a February 26, 2018 Carnegie Institution Press Release. Dr. Nakajima, who is of the Carnegie Institution of Washington (D.C.), along with California Institute of Technology's (Caltech's) Dr. David Stevenson, set out to determine whether prevailing lunar formation models need to be adjusted to explain more recent higher estimates of the quantity of water on Earth's Moon. Caltech is in Pasadena.

Other facts:

The Giant-Impact Theory, alternatively termed the Theia Impact, or Big Splash Theory, proposes that Earth's Moon was born from the debris remaining from a catastrophic collision, that occurred about 4.3 billion years ago, between the primordial Earth and an unfortunate protoplanet, that was about the size of Mars. The Earth's Moon-forming collision would have occurred when our Solar System was still forming during the Hadean eon. The Hadean eon occurred about 20 to 100 million years after our Solar System emerged from its frigid, dark natal cloud of gas and dust. The doomed impacting protoplanet, often called Theia, received its name in honor of a Titan in Greek mythology who was the mother of Selene, the Moon goddess. An analysis of lunar rocks, published in 2016, indicates that this catastrophic crash was a direct hit--causing a thorough mixing of both Earth-stuff and Theia-stuff. The Giant-Impact Theory is the favored scientific explanation for the birth of Earth's Moon.



The more recently obtained data concerning the Red Planet comes from seven active probes that either roam the Martian surface or orbit around the planet. The seven spacecraft include a quintet of orbiters and a duo of rovers. This collection includes 2001 Mars Odyssey, Mars Express, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, MAVEN, Mars Orbiter Mission, Opportunity, and Curiosity.



If you were to take an Apollo 11 quiz in school, you would likely find that one of the main focuses is the fact that it was the first mission to carry humans to the moon. It was on this voyage that the famous words, "That's one small step for man; one giant leap for mankind," were uttered by Neil Armstrong as he became the first human being to ever set foot on the moon.