Gliese 667C Compared To Earth current potential habitable worlds update february 2012 667C Earth To Gliese Compared

Gliese 667C Compared To Earth current potential habitable worlds update february 2012 667C Earth To Gliese Compared

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Interesting facts about space.

The team also considered whether it would be possible to determine, with an adequate degree of certainty, if a detected moon could bear life-loving liquid water. In their analysis, the "input" climate for the moon is habitable, which is identified with high probability. However, there still remains approximately a one in six failure rate.



and here is another

Discovering the water content of volcanic deposits on our Moon using orbital instruments presents quite a challenge. Planetary scientists use orbital spectrometers to measure the light that skips off of a planetary surface. By determining which electromagnetic wavelengths of light are reflected or absorbed by the surface, the scientists can then get an idea of which minerals and other compounds are present.



and finally

The astronomer Tycho Brahe, during the 17th century, measured the diurnal parallax of Mars that Johannes Kepler had used in order to make a preliminary calculation of the relative distance to the Red Planet. When the earliest telescopes to be used for astronomical purposes finally became available, the diurnal parallax of Mars was measured again in an attempt to determine the distance between our Sun and Earth. Giovanni Domenico Cassini was the first to make this measurement in 1692--but the early parallax measurements were hindered by the primitive quality of the instruments. The only occultation of Mars by the planet Venus was observed on October 13, 1590, by Michael Maestlin at Heidelberg. In 1610, Mars was viewed by the great astronomer Galileo Galilei, who was the first to make use of a primitive telescope for astronomical purposes. The Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens was the first to draw a map of Mars that showed terrain features.

Other facts:

A moon is an enchanting thing! There are more than 100 lovely moons circling the eight major planets in our Solar System, alone--including our own beloved Moon--the brightest and largest gleaming object suspended in the brilliantly starry night sky above the Earth. But how did the moons of our Solar System come into being?



Asphaug and co-author Dr. Andreas Reufer of the University of Bern in Switzerland, devised their new giant impact model using sophisticated computer simulations. They discovered that mergers between moons the size of Jupiter's Galilean satellites--which range in size from 1,940 miles wide (Europa) to 3, 271 miles across (Ganymede)--would tear icy stuff off the outer layers of the colliding moons. This icy material would then form spiral arms, which would ultimately merge together due to gravitational attraction to create Saturn's mid-sized icy moons.



New Moon and Full Moon Times. New Moon, June 12, 2010 4:15 am, PDT. Full Moon, June 26, 2010 4:31 am, PDT