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Interesting facts about space.

Using N-body simulations that model a recently snared Triton, and a likely primordial prograde system of moons, Dr. Rufu and Dr. Canup show that if the moons sport a mass ratio comparable to that of Uranus's system of moons or smaller, Triton's destructive dance with them has the tragic likelihood of reproducing the system that astronomers now observe. The simulations even demonstrate that the interactions decrease Triton's original semi-major axis rapidly enough to to stop smaller, outer moons like Nereid from being unceremoniously evicted from the system.



and here is another

The truth is that Pluto's large moon Charon is a freak. Pluto and Charon do not behave like a "normal" planet-and-moon duo. In fact, the system is unique in our Solar System because the two small, icy worlds face each other and spin together around a fixed point. For this reason, many planetary scientists have suggested that Pluto and Charon actually form a binary system--rather than that of a moon and planet pair. The new research shows that the chaotic movements of Pluto's smaller moons are caused by this weird Pluto-Charon relationship.



and finally

It is true that even our most powerful telescopes aimed at the landing sites wouldn't see anything. However, not because the Moon landings didn't happen. It is only because of the optical limitations of telescopes themselves, because of their limited size and distance from the Moon.

Other facts:

Some of the images focus on the shallow center of a bizarre impact crater dubbed Pwyll. Impact rays and shattered pieces of material scattered over an immense area of the moon tell the tale of a sizeable meteorite that collided violently with Europa relatively recently--"only" about 10 to 100 million years ago. There is also darker debris chaotically scattered around Pwyll. This further suggests that the large crashing meteorite may have dug up some deeply buried material, and tossed it helter-skelter around the crater.



The vanished, ill-fated, large moon could have been a few hundred kilometers in diameter. The large moon would also have allowed a handful of other smaller moons to form--including the duo of small, shapeless ones that survive today. However, this large inner moon would have been born close to or within the Roche limit. This is why it is likely that it crashed into Mars as a result of tidal forces within several million years--and the collection of other small moons followed their leader. Only Phobos and Deimos kept their distance.



JAXA has announced a space mission scheduled to begin in 2022, with an expected return to Earth in 2026. "Its objective is to carry out close-up remote sensing and in-situ observations of both Phobos and Deimos, and to bring back samples from Phobos," commented Dr. Ryuki Hyodo in the July 4, 2016 CNRS Press Release. Dr. Hyodo is a planetary scientist, originally from Kobe University in Japan, and he is also currently collaborating with the IPG. "High-resolution impact simulations are still needed to understand more about the disk structure," he continued to explain to the press.