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Interesting facts about space.

The model indicates that Triton originated as part of a binary system, much like Pluto and its large moon Charon. "It's not so much that Charon orbits Pluto, but rather both move around their mutual center of mass, which lies between two objects," Agnor added.



and here is another

The most detailed pictures of Europa show even more intriguing clues that there is slush lurking beneath its brightly shining icy surface. Slightly smaller than Earth's own beloved Moon, Europa's surface temperature could easily freeze an ocean solid over a span of only several million years. However, some astronomers think that warmth from a game of tidal tug-of-war between Europa and Jupiter, as well as other neighboring moons, could be keeping large regions of Europa's subsurface global ocean in a life-friendly liquid state. This process is termed tidal heating, and it refers to a mechanism whereby the gravitational tugs of a nearby object (or objects) flex and bend and contract and expand another object continually. This constant churning causes the victimized object, in this case Europa, to heat up and be considerably more balmy than its great distance from the Sun would otherwise allow it to be.



and finally

A moon is a natural body that orbits a planet, and is held in its orbit by the force of both the host planet's gravity and the gravity of the moon itself. Some planets sport moons; some do not. Most of the moons dwelling in our Solar System are frigid (and sometimes weird) little worlds, made up of ice and rock, that swarm around the outer giant, gaseous planets of our Sun's bewitching family--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. One example of such bewitching weirdness is the frozen, little icy moon Hyperion, of the ringed-planet Saturn, that looks like an icy natural sponge.

Other facts:

Most of the moons of our Solar System are icy little desolate and dead worlds, dwelling in the dark, cold stillness of those regions far from the warmth and light of our Sun. However, a few of these small bodies may not be lifeless. For example, Europa of Jupiter may have a subsurface global ocean of liquid water secreted beneath its cracked, jumbled frozen crust of ice. This subsurface ocean might be warmed by tidal flexing into a hospitable, life-friendly liquid-water state, where primitive life-forms may swim around in the deep-sea darkness beneath Europa's ice. In addition, the second-largest moon in our Solar System, Titan of Saturn, possesses an environment that is eerily similar to that of our own planet long before life evolved out of the lifeless ooze (prebiotic). Big, lazy raindrops of liquid hydrocarbons float to the surface of this tormented, frigid moon, forming seas and lakes composed of methane and ethane that play the same role as water on Earth. It is entirely possible that life, as we do not know it, can evolve and flourish using liquids other than water. The largest moon of our Solar System, Ganymede of Jupiter, is larger than the innermost planet Mercury. Like its sister-moon Europa, Ganymede may hold secreted, beneath its surface crust of ice, a global ocean of liquid water. The little icy moon, Enceladus of Saturn, spews out geysers of water mixed with ammonia (which plays the role of antifreeze) from its so-called "tiger stripes". Therefore, Enceladus could also harbor life-loving water hidden beneath its icy surface.



"We think that the giant planets got their satellites kind of like the Sun got its planets, growing like miniature solar systems and ending with a stage of final collisions," lead author Dr. Erik Asphaug, of the University of California at Santa Cruz, said in a statement to the press on October 18, 2012.



Songs, poems, odes, reveries. The Moon has been the subject of endless adoration since the beginning of time. Mysterious and changeable, sometimes occulted by clouds or (gasp!) the Earth itself, our satellite, our iridescent child, the Moon floats suspended in the sky, enticing us to dream, to wonder, to reflect. To garden in the moonlight, to walk in the woods with the moon shining through foliage or bare branches, whenever we have the chance to have her silvery light embrace us we know we are being touched by the hand of the divine feminine and we are blessed.