Astronaut High School Sports week 5 titusville 35 astronaut 14 usa today high School High Sports Astronaut

Astronaut High School Sports week 5 titusville 35 astronaut 14 usa today high School High Sports Astronaut

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Interesting facts about space.

In nature, moon jellies spend most of their time drifting on currents rather that swimming. In captivity, they will require an aquarium with a well designed turbulence system to keep them from becoming a helpless ball of gelatinous goo at the bottom of your tank.



and here is another

Some studies which have been performed in certain cities within the United States show that there is no correlation between the full moon phase and such things as a rise in suicides, crime rate, dog bites or births. And yet, other studies completed by such individuals as psychologists and other human behaviorists have shown that there is, in fact, a peak in certain kinds of behavior associated with a loss of contact with reality during full moons. These include murder, arson, dangerous driving and kleptomania, which is an irresistible impulse to steal due to an emotional rather than economical need.



and finally

With such intriguing results before them, the team of astronomers studied the data to determine if Kepler-22b actually has a moon. Unfortunately, their analysis reveals no evidence for the existence of an exomoon circling Kepler-22b. This non-detection suggests that the mass of any companion world around Kepler-22b must be less than 0.54 times the mass of our planet--with an impressive confidence rate of 95%! Therefore, it is very unlikely that Kepler-22b is circled by an Earth-like moon. Nevertheless, it is still too soon to give up hope. The Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler project has studied nine planetary systems in search of exomoons. Although none were detected, with the team's new results about the possibility of finding Earth-sized moons and the remaining treasure trove of Kepler data to sift through, large and possibly even habitable exomoons may start being spotted in the near future.

Other facts:

In the tragicomedy that characterizes human relationships, it has been said that the closer we get to someone, the weirder that person gets. Earth's Moon is our planet's closest neighbor in Space--mysterious, bewitching, bothersome, and bewildering, it has successfully hidden many of its secrets from the prying eyes of curious observers. In July 2017, using satellite data, a team of astronomers announced that they have, for the first time, detected widespread water hidden within ancient explosive volcanic material on Earth's nearest and dearest companion world. This discovery indicates that the interior of Earth's Moon contains large quantities of indigenous water that has finally been revealed in numerous volcanic deposits distributed across the lunar surface--and these ancient deposits contain unusually high amounts of imprisoned water compared with surrounding terrains. The discovery of water in these ancient lunar deposits, which are believed to be composed of glass beads created in the explosive fiery eruption of magma shooting out from the deep interior of the Moon, strengthens the theory that the lunar mantle is surprisingly water-rich.



Saturn is probably the most beautiful planet in our Sun's lovely family, with its magnificent system of enchanting rings, gleaming icy moons, and myriads of tumbling moonlets that dance and somersault both within and outside of the rings. One of Saturn's moons is Titan, the second largest moon in our Solar System, after Ganymede of Jupiter. Shrouded in a dense orange mist, Titan is famous for its frozen clouds of methane, and hydrocarbon seas and lakes. Titan's thick, veiling atmosphere is composed of a wonderful icy soup of compounds very much like those thought to have been present in Earth's primordial atmosphere. Titan's thick atmosphere--which is much denser than Earth's atmosphere--contains mostly nitrogen, like that of our own planet. But Titan's atmosphere also contains significantly greater percentages of such so-called "smoggy" chemicals as methane and ethane. The smog on Titan is so extremely dense that it actually rains "gasoline-like" liquids down on the surface of this bizarre world. Indeed, some of the chemicals discovered in Titan's atmosphere might indicate that simple and primitive methane-based life (methanogens), might dwell on this truly weird moon.



Until 2004, no spacecraft had visited Saturn in over two decades. Pioneer 11 had snapped the very first close-up images of Saturn when it flew past in 1979, Voyager 1 had its rendezvous about a year later, and in August 1981 Voyager 2 had its brief but highly productive encounter. At last, on July 1, 2004, NASA's Cassini spacecraft went into orbit around Saturn, and started taking breathtaking photographs.